When My Child’s Fluency = My Success

Reading Time: 4 minutes

fluency

One benefit of my kids growing up overseas is their rich experience of another culture.  My kids absorb elements of the adopted country in an organic way.  They often see the world with a different perspective from someone–even an adult–who hasn’t left their home country.

I love that my kids have adopted certain aspects from Egypt: They have favorite Egyptian foods. They wash their hands after eating, and believe tissues are reasonable as napkins at the table. My kids know how to say “thank you” to mean “no” if they don’t want something being offered.  I love that three of my kids write and speak some Arabic and understand even more. read more

Does Christianity destroy culture?

Reading Time: 5 minutes
christianity destroy culture

Photo credit: IMB.org

Editor’s note: We’re pulling this post from the archives to answer a key recurring question: Does Christianity destroy culture? Are you importing Western culture when you bring the Gospel? We weigh in. 

If you’ve ever stood in the middle of African worship, it’s…well, it’s pretty hard to stand still. read more

What I Wish I Would Have Known: Sarah’s Perspective

Reading Time: 6 minutes

before you go without

When you leave YOUR HOME COUNTRY, always pack chocolate chips, Secret deodorant,  books you can’t live without, and tampons. 

(some things you don’t want to mess around with.)

When you’re scrambling to imagine life without something? When it’s important to you? Pack it.

Sure, there are many things you will learn to live without (see my next point) and there are some things you don’t want to have to live without.

It’s okay to have certain things that are your “items” that you bring with you. Your list of essentials might be different from mine.  The point is everyone has certain things they don’t want to have to live without and that’s okay. read more

10 Realities a Missionary Probably Won’t Tell You

Reading Time: 11 minutes
missionary realities overseas global work hard truth Go. Serve. Love is psyched about featuring this post from missionary Joe Holman; it originally posted on his blog and is gratefully used with permission. Fun fact about Joe: He and his wife totally pull off the missionary thing amidst a family of 13. They’ve served in Bolivia since 2007. 

First, the Disclaimers.

I’m going out on a limb here, so I’ll put some disclaimers up in advance.

1. I love being a missionary.

This post points out bad aspects you’ll not hear us normally say.  It doesn’t mean I’m unhappy or unfulfilled.

2. I’m speaking of feelings and perceptions.

I know what the Bible says and can give a counterpoint to each of these.  For example, when I share how we feel about shortchanging my children, I know that there are 100 positive things that people can point out to me. read more

Why to Learn Their Heart-Language, Even if They Speak Yours: Part II

Reading Time: 3 minutes
language

photo credit IMB.org photo library

Missed Part I? Grab it here.

My husband and I sat with a friend who’d spent years in Japan as a businessman. (He helped me with Go. Serve. Love’s post, Unreached People Group Focus: Japanese.)

We spoke of the culture of conformity of the Japanese. And my friend related a proverb–loosely translated, “The nail that sticks up gets pounded down.” read more

My Story: Will I Bend or Break Overseas?

Reading Time: 3 minutes

flexibility bend break

During the month of August, Go. Serve. Love is stoked to share stories from All Nations, a global training and sending agency.

All Nation’s vision is to see Jesus worshiped by all the peoples of the earth.  Their mission? To make disciples and train leaders to ignite church planting movements among the neglected peoples of the earth. read more